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Wine Industry Calls on Provinces to Open Borders to Direct Wine Delivery

OTTAWA, ON – June 27, 2013 – Tomorrow, June 28th, 2013, marks the one-year anniversary of the passage of Bill C-311.  This momentous bill, sponsored by Dan Albas, Member of Parliament (Okanagan-Coquihalla), effectively amended the prohibition-era Importation of Intoxicating Liquors Act, removing the federal restrictions prohibiting individuals from transporting wine from across provincial borders when purchased for personal use.

One year later, only two provinces – British Columbia and Manitoba – have permitted for the direct shipment of wine from a licensed Canadian winery to residents, while the remaining provinces and territories continue to object to the national legislation.  Thus, despite Bill C-311’s unanimous federal support, the majority of Canadian wine consumers are still prohibited from purchasing directly from out-of-province wineries.

“The Canadian wine industry applauds the federal government for removing an 84 year old law which had restricted the opportunities for Canada’s growing wine industry to satisfy consumer demand for direct sales and delivery,” said Dan Paszkowski, President and CEO of the Canadian Vintners Association (CVA).

“There are now over 500 wineries in Canada, and with each vintage, more wines are produced than can be stocked or sold by liquor stores; however, that shouldn’t prevent an adult from purchasing Canadian wine directly from an out-of-province winery,” stated Paszkowski.  “Consumers expect to be able to purchase the wines they want, in the manner of their choosing: from liquor stores, at the winery, through winery wine clubs, or online.  Direct-to-consumer delivery would satisfy consumer demand, help local wineries grow their business, and augment liquor store sales.  It is also good for rural communities and the entire Canadian economy.”

A recent study calculated the annual economic impact of the Canadian wine industry to be $6.8 billion, supporting over 31,000 jobs […]

Want to buy wine from another province? Why the rules are (still) confusing

Globe and Mail (Feb. 28, 2013): It has been eight months since Ottawa decriminalized direct-to-consumer wine sales across provincial lines. That enlightened amendment to an outdated law, unanimously approved in the House of Commons, was designed to free up access to small-lot Canadian wines, many of which are not carried in liquor stores across the country. But this is Canada, where it takes more than an act of Parliament or the will of the people to break the shackles of almighty liquor boards.

Read the full story here

Canadian Wine and Grape Industry Contributes $6.8 Billion

Canadian Wine and Grape Industry Contributes $6.8 Billion in Economic Impact to Canadian Economy

Most comprehensive examination ever conducted in Canadian wine industry history

Ottawa, Ontario – The findings of the largest research study ever conducted on the Canadian wine and grape industry reveal a prosperous and expanding $6.8 billion dollar industry.

Commissioned by the Canadian Vintners Association, the Winery & Grower Alliance of Ontario, the British Columbia Wine Institute and the Winery Association of Nova Scotia, the report titled Canada’s Wine Economy – Ripe Robust Remarkable confirms the wine industry has become a large and significant contributor to the overall Canadian economy, especially in Ontario, British Columbia, Quebec and Nova Scotia.

“The research findings reinforce the significant economic value the Canadian wine industry brings to the national economy,” said Dan Paszkowski, President, Canadian Vintners Association. “The impacts are both direct and indirect, from job creation and tourism to tax generation and agricultural growth, the wine industry benefits multiple business sectors across the entire Canadian economy,” he added.

Key Findings:

  • Canadian wine industry production has an annual national economic impact of $6.8 billion. Specifically, for every bottle of wine produced in Canada there is $31 of domestic economic impact generated in the country.
  • The wine and grape industry is responsible for more than 31,000 jobs in Canada from manufacturing, agriculture, tourism, transportation, research, restaurants and retail.
  • Wine-related tourism welcomes more than 3 million visitors each year, generating more than $1.2 billion annually in tourism revenue and employment.
  • The wine industry generates $1.2 billion in federal and provincial tax revenue and liquor board mark up.
  • Canadians enjoy over 1 billion glasses or 220 million bottles of wine produced by the Canadian wine industry each year.

Canadian winemakers support a broad network of related industries in urban […]